North Range Concerned Citizens

We are a coalition of Commerce City neighborhoods that firmly believes industrial activity is incompatible with residential areas anywhere.


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Public Comment on Draft Operator Agreement July 9 - 29

Commerce City has drafted a Regional Operator Agreement with Extraction Oil & Gas, LLC for 11 heavy-industry sites with pipeline infrastructure for 254 horizontal wellbores fracked under our homes and schools and emitting toxic invisible gasses in a massive residential area with 30,000 men, women, children, and the elderly.

It was drafted well before any rulemaking could be done at the COGCC after Senate Bill 181 prioritized our health and safety first when regulating the industry. It was done while other counties and cities are declaring moratoriums on oil and gas operations. Let the City Council know that we deserve better than this, the fracking does not belong near homes or schools.

Click here to view the agreement on the City Council website

What can I do?

Email us and we'll add you to our mailing list! We'll keep you up to date on what's going on in the industry, meetings, events, and get you connected with others that share you concerns. You can be involved as much or as little as you'd like.

Contact the City Council of Commerce City

You deserve to be heard! The City Council is here to serve you and sending a email or even a quick call to voice your opinion can go a long way! Let them know that you do not support fracking in residential areas and are concerned about the oil and gas industry's growing presence in our neighborhoods. Let them know that oil and gas operations are dangerous and should not be happening close to our homes, schools and drinking water.

Contact your State Senator and The Governor

Write to your State Senator and the Governor to let them know you support legislation that limits fracking near our homes. Your communications give them the evidence they need to pass legislation that we want!

Articles & Reports


  • Special Report: U.S. builders hoard mineral rights under new homes

    Homeowners, once they find out they don’t own the earth under their feet, are typically not pleased. Many worry about the potential health and environmental effects of fracking. Research has yet to resolve the fierce debate over whether the process leads to ground, air and drinking-water contamination.

    Janet Damon lives in a Denver community where builder Oakwood Homes leased out the underlying mineral rights to Anadarko Energy. And though drilling has yet to occur, Damon says, the possibility alone “has caused so much anxiety for families living in this radius that people started having health issues, panic attacks, because they’re so concerned about their kids and families.” Anadarko said it has since assigned the lease to ConocoPhillips as a part of a larger transaction. ConocoPhillips confirmed that it holds the lease.

  • Report: Climate change could make insurance too expensive for most people

    Insurers have warned that climate change could make cover for ordinary people unaffordable after the world’s largest reinsurance firm blamed global warming for $24bn of losses in the Californian wildfires.

  • The Next Financial Crisis Lurks Underground

    Some of fracking’s biggest skeptics are on Wall Street. They argue that the industry’s financial foundation is unstable: Frackers haven’t proven that they can make money. “The industry has a very bad history of money going into it and never coming out,” says the hedge fund manager Jim Chanos, who founded one of the world’s largest short-selling hedge funds. The 60 biggest exploration and production firms are not generating enough cash from their operations to cover their operating and capital expenses. In aggregate, from mid-2012 to mid-2017, they had negative free cash flow of $9 billion per quarter.

  • Impact of Fracking on Home Insurance Coverage

    The increase in seismic risk in these areas usually underscores the need for homeowners to consider purchasing earthquake insurance that covers damage from induced earthquakes. However, some earthquake policies carve out coverage for earthquakes not naturally occurring, such as earthquakes attributed to waste water injection from hydraulic fracturing activities. Furthermore, many policies have anti-concurrent causation provisions excluding coverage for damage if both a covered and uncovered peril occur, regardless of whether the predominate cause of the loss was a covered loss. This could mean insurers may deny losses for covered perils, such as a fire, if the fire resulted from an uncovered peril, such as an induced earthquake.